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BIO 131: Human Anatomy and Physiology I

Free Online Textbook

Openstax Anatomy and Physiology

"The book is organized by body system and covers standard scope and sequence requirements... The web-based version of Anatomy and Physiology also features links to surgical videos, histology, and interactive diagrams."

In this Guide

transparent skull modelThis guide is provided to offer sources for research on topics related to Human Anatomy and Physiology

Use the left menu to navigate this guide.

What's Inside:

Find Articles A selection of "best bet" databases to use when looking for journal articles.

Find Books Suggested books, and online catalog search help tips.

Find Video Suggested online videos and video search.

Find Web Pages Free study sets and tips for online searching.

APA Style Guide Guides for formatting papers.

Questions? Ask a Librarian!

Science News Literacy and the Scientific Method

Know how to verify legitimate scientific claims, and debunk junk science.

The Problem of Bad Science:Simple model of scientific method

"'Bad Science' Is Everywhere. What Can We Do to Stop Its Spread?" 

"Why most published research findings are false" (2005)

"Even in 2015, the public doesn't trust scientists"

Addressing the Problem:

The Center for Open Science - Providing an infrastructure for detailed reporting scientific experiments and and the promotion of reproducible discoveries.

Unpaywall - Browser plugin that allows legal and free access to full texts of peer reviewed journal articles. Best when paired with the Open Access Button - Free, legal research articles and data delivered instantly or automatically requested from authors.

Little Maxima - Virtual Reality News Reader

The C.R.A.P. test, explained (video) - Evaluating sources by Currency, Reliability, Authority, and Purpose/Point of view.

More on the Scientific Method. From Dziak, M. (2014). Scientific method. Salem Press Encyclopedia Of Science.

Basic Terms and Definitions

Carbohydrate: The term applied to an organic substance in which the hydrogen and oxygen are usually in the proportion to form water. Carbohydrates are all, chemically considered, derivatives of simple forms of sugar and are classified as monosaccharides (e.g. glucose), disaccharides (e.g. cane sugar) and polysaccharides (e.g. starch). Many of the cheaper and most important foods are included in this group, which comprises sugars, starches, celluloses and gums.

Carbohydrate. (2010). In H. Marcovitch (Ed.), Black's medical dictionary, 42nd edition. London, UK: A&C Black. Retrieved from http://ezproxy.mc3.edu/login?qurl=http%3A%2F%2Fsearch.credoreference.com%2Fcontent%2Fentry%2Fblackmed%2Fcarbohydrate%2F0

Diet: The mixture of food and drink consumed by an individual... [A healthy diet] provides all essential nutrients in sufficient quantities to prevent deficiencies but which also avoids health problems associated with nutrient excesses.

Diet. (2010). In H. Marcovitch (Ed.), Black's medical dictionary, 42nd edition. London, United Kingdom: A&C Black. Retrieved from http://search.credoreference.com/content/entry/blackmed/diet/0

Digestion: The three processes by which the body incorporates food are digestion, ABSORPTION, and ASSIMILATION. In digestion, food is softened and converted into a form soluble in the watery fluids of the body; or, in the case of fat, into minute globules. The substances formed are then absorbed from the intestines and carried throughout the body by the blood. In assimilation, these substances, deposited from the blood, are used by the various tissues for their growth and repair.

Digestion. (2010). In H. Marcovitch (Ed.), Black's medical dictionary, 42nd edition. London, United Kingdom: A&C Black. Retrieved from http://search.credoreference.com/content/entry/blackmed/digestion/0

Lipids: Any of a heterogeneous group of fats and fatlike substances characterized by being water-insoluble and being extractable by nonpolar (or fat) solvents such as alcohol, ether, chloroform, benzene, etc. [Lipids] serve as a source of fuel, are an important constituent of cell structure, and serve other biological functions.

Lipid. (2011). In W. Dorland, Dorland's illustrated medical dictionary. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier Health Sciences. Retrieved from http://search.credoreference.com/content/entry/ehsdorland/lipid/0

Proteins: The major source of building material for muscles, blood, skin, hair, nails, and the internal organs. It is necessary for the formation of many hormones, enzymes, and antibodies and may act as a source of energy.

Protein. (2012). In Mosby, Mosby's dictionary of Medicine, Nursing & Health professions. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier Health Sciences. Retrieved from http://search.credoreference.com/content/entry/ehsmosbymed/protein/0

amino acid structure, building block of proteinOf the more than 80 amino acids which have been found in living organisms, about 20 serve as the building blocks for the proteins.

 

 

Mineral: Any of a group of inorganic elements that are essential to humans and animals for normal body function. In nutrition, minerals are those elements for which the body's requirement is at least 100 mg per day, and trace minerals are those elements that are needed in smaller amounts.

Mineral, dietary. (2016). In Columbia University & P. Lagasse, The Columbia Encyclopedia. New York, NY: Columbia University Press. Retrieved from http://ezproxy.mc3.edu/login?qurl=http%3A%2F%2Fsearch.credoreference.com%2Fcontent%2Fentry%2Fcolumency%2Fmineral_dietary%2F0

Nucleic Acid: Any of a group of organic substances found in the chromosomes of living cells and viruses that play a central role in the storage and replication of hereditary information and in the expression of this information through protein synthesis.

Nucleic acid. (2016). In P. Lagasse, & Columbia University, The Columbia encyclopedia. New York, NY: Columbia University Press. Retrieved from http://ezproxy.mc3.edu/login?qurl=http%3A%2F%2Fsearch.credoreference.com%2Fcontent%2Fentry%2Fcolumency%2Fnucleic_acid%2F0

Nutrient: A food or other substance that provides energy or building material for the survival and growth of a living organism.

Nutrient. (2011). In W. Dorland, Dorland's illustrated medical dictionary. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier Health Sciences. Retrieved from http://search.credoreference.com/content/entry/ehsdorland/nutrient/0

Water: Sixty per cent of a man's body weight is water, and 50 per cent of a woman's; those proportions need to be maintained within quite narrow limits to ensure proper functioning of body tissues. Body fluids contain a variety of mineral salts and these, too, must remain within narrow concentration bands.

Dehydration. (2010). In H. Marcovitch (Ed.), Black's medical dictionary, 42nd edition. London, UK: A&C Black. Retrieved from http://ezproxy.mc3.edu/login?qurl=http%3A%2F%2Fsearch.credoreference.com%2Fcontent%2Fentry%2Fblackmed%2Fdehydration%2F0

Vitamins: A group of substances which exist in minute quantities in natural foods, and which are necessary to normal nutrition, especially in connection with growth and development.

Vitamin. (2010). In H. Marcovitch (Ed.), Black's medical dictionary, 42nd edition. London, United Kingdom: A&C Black. Retrieved from http://search.credoreference.com/content/entry/blackmed/vitamin/0